Protecting your preps (Security) is one of the basic five basic survival priorities, and is usually one of the last things we think about when it comes to preparations.  One way I have been looking at protecting some of my preps, is to begin caching them along my Bug Out routes… The reason for this is that, my philosophy in a SHTF, is that because of the sheer number of people in northern NJ just outside NYC, I am getting the heck out of Dodge.  That said, depending on the Bug Out situation, I may or may not be able to bring more than a Bug Out Bag with me…  If that is the case, resources are certainly limited, and some of them are disposable resources that you may need or want to replenish along your route, whether by BOV or on foot.  

So that said, you may want to look into caching some of your supplies. i.e. a smaller portion of your beans, grains, and rice somewhere on your route to a rendezvous point or a BOL. I am starting to give more serious consideration to it myself. In fact, I am looking at multiple cache locations along multiple routes. This is a more expensive venture, but not as expensive as it would be in the event I didn’t have the caches… As a single person, quite possibly bugging out of the suburbs on my own to a more rural area, I figure I can cache supplies such as the below in a 6″ or 8″ PVC tube as long as it is properly sealed for burial or hanging in a tree.  Thank Scott Williams, for that idea from your book.

Each container would contain the following:

  1. One 5lb package of brown rice (shrink wrapped with food saver)
  2. Five 1lb bags of dried legumes (assorted bags, 1 chick peas, one black beans, one peas, one pinto beans, etc.) – shrink wrapped with food saver
  3. One .22 caliber long rifle, oiled and shrink wrapped with food saver (either assembled or disassembled) Possibly a Henry AR-7 or a disassembled Ruger 10/22
  4. One brick 500 Rounds of .22 Long Ammunition (coated rounds like CCI, because the Henry likes them better than a standard lead round), shrink wrapped
  5. One pair of BDUs and/or Jeans, Shirt, socks, underwear, hat, and gloves, shrink wrapped
  6. One, knife, such as a Mora or Ka-Bar
  7. Fishing lures, line, hooks, bobbers, etc.
  8. Stainless Steel water container to carry and boil water, beans, and/or rice in.
  9. EDC items such as a multi-tool, firesteel, matches, lighter, first aid items, etc. Possibly an exact duplicate of my EDC Altoids kit.  (http://suburbansurvivalblog.com/my-altoids-edc-emergency-kit)
  10. Emergency Space Blanket(s)
  11. Emergency Poncho
  12. Light Sticks
  13. Compass
  14. First Aid Supplies and Hygiene products
  15. Paracord

These things should take care of several or all of the survival priorities for me:

  1. Food
  2. Shelter
  3. Fire
  4. Navigation
  5. Signaling
  6. Security
  7. Water
  8. First Aid

For me, the eight listed priorities are of equal importance if I ever need a to dig up a cache. What might be missing would be a pistol that can share the same ammunition as a rifle for some added security. This cache financially would run me approximately $350.00 – $400.00 each. Not inexpensive if you are caching two or three systems, however, cheap if you need them.

10 pounds of dehydrated beans and rice would last me at least a week, and I am sure I could pick up a squirrel, rabbit, etc, along the way if needed… Small game is the way to go if you are Bugging Out and much more accessible if hoofing it.

If you already have the supplies, then it costs you time, and possibly the replacement of some of the items you are going to cache…

On the flip side, if you don’t “need” them and you pick one or two of them up along the way, you have increased your resources as well as may have some barter items for the future.

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We’re a group of suburban preppers in the Northeast and live in the NYC suburbs that write The Suburban Survival Blog to talk about preparedness and self-reliance out there to help others prepare for what could be an uncertain future due to economic, weather, and other reasons.